HARTS AT SEA — SAILING TO WINDWARD

BY BARBARA HART (HART ENTERPRISES, 2012; 246 PAGES; $12.99 PAPERBACK, $2.99 KINDLE EDITION)
REVIEW BY KAREN LARSON

 

When a very gregarious plugged-in woman agrees to go cruising with her husband for an indefinite period of time — alone, just the two of them on a sailboat — it must be all about love. In her book, Harts at Sea – Sailing to Windward, Barbara says she knew he was a Sailor (with a capital “S”) when she married Stewart:
“When he finally proposed to me after a game of darts in a Portland (Maine) bar, he qualified this already unromantic moment by stating, ‘Before you reply you need to know that someday I will have a sailboat and will sail around the world.'”

I cried. These were not tears of joy.

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MARITIME TALES OF LAKE ONTARIO

BY SUSAN PETERSON GATELEY (THE HISTORY PRESS, 2012; 128 PAGES; $19.99)
REVIEW BY CAROLYN CORBETT

Susan Peterson Gateley has written a jewel of a book for history buffs with maritime leanings. In the author’s words, Maritime Tales of Lake Ontario is a “collection of historic incidents and personalities who once worked on and by the waters of this Great Lake between 1728 and the present.” An abundance of pictures and illustrations accompany this well written and meticulously researched history of Lake Ontario, as Susan brings past ages to life.

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COST CONTROL WHILE YOU CRUISE

BY LIN AND LARRY PARDEY, EDITED AND PRODUCED BY TORY SALVIA <HTTP://WWW.LANDLPARDEY.COM> OR <HTTP://WWW.THESAILINGCHANNEL.COM>), 65 MINUTES PLUS EXTRAS, $24.95 FOR DVD, $12.95 FOR DOWNLOAD
REVIEW BY KAREN LARSON

 

Lin and Larry Pardey’s newest video is another excellent production. These two have never done anything but top-notch books, videos, lecture series, presentations, and whatever else they decide to take on.

As the narrator, Lin explains that they cannot offer their very popular lectures everywhere in the country so they have decided to offer some of the highlights on video. The most frequently asked questions are consistently: How much does it cost to go cruising and how can we control those costs? Ergo, the theme of this video.

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SAILBOAT PROJECTS

BY CLARENCE JONES (WINNING NEWS MEDIA, 2012; E-BOOK; 93 PAGES; KINDLE AND NOOK EDITIONS: $2.99).
REVIEW BY KAREN LARSON

Clarence Jones has always been a sailor and do-it-yourselfer. He describes himself as a writer/mechanic/inventor/tinkerer. Your choice. His inventions have been installed in a MacGregor 21 and 25, a Precision 18 and 21 and, most recently, a Catalina 28. He’s written several articles for Good Old Boat and more are in the hopper.

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COMMANDER: THE LIFE AND EXPLOITS OF BRITAIN’S GREATEST FRIGATE CAPTAIN

BY STEPHEN TAYLOR (W.W. NORTON & COMPANY, 2012; 368 PAGES; RELEASE DATE: OCTOBER 15, 2012; $28.95 (HARDCOVER); $15.37 KINDLE EDITION, AVAILABLE OCTOBER 8; NOOK EDITION AVAILABLE OCTOBER 15.
REVIEW BY KAREN LARSON

 

Every so often, when reading fiction accounts of the Age of Fighting Sail in the late 1700s and early 1800s, you’ll come across the name of Sir Edward Pellew. He was a contemporary of Vice Admiral Horatio Lord Nelson and — as author Stephen Taylor has convinced me —an equally important British naval officer, albeit one who never achieved the same star status.

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THE ANGEL ISLAND CONSPIRACY

BY ROBERT BANKS HULL, (IUNIVERSE, INC., 2010; 119 PAGES; $11.95 ON AMAZON.COM AND BN.COM)
REVIEW BY SUSAN LYNN KINGSBURY

 

Told in the first person, The Angel Island Conspiracy is an action/thriller/mystery that reads like a true-life story. Author Robert Banks Hull sets his story on Angel Island, a real tourist destination off the Pacific coast of San Francisco. Hull uses his knowledge of the island, San Francisco, and the surrounding waters to create a vivid and believable backdrop for his tale.

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ACROSS ISLANDS AND OCEANS: A JOURNEY ALONE AROUND THE WORLD BY SAIL AND BY FOOT

BY JAMES BALDWIN; 2012 ATOM VOYAGES.COM; 370 PAGES
($9.95 PAPERBACK; HTTPS://WWW.CREATESPACE.COM/3786486;
$1.99 EBOOK FOR KINDLE; HTTP://WWW.AMAZON.COM/DP/B00738SYEG)

REVIEW BY KAREN LARSON

James Baldwin needs no introduction to most sailors. He’s the guy who went twice around in a modified Pearson Triton and now makes wonderful modifications to other people’s boats from a home base in Brunswick, Georgia. When we’re lucky, he writes about those refits for the readers of Good Old Boat.

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WORLD CRUISING DESTINATIONS

BY JIMMY CORNELL (INTERNATIONAL MARINE/MCGRAW-HILL, 2010; 432 PAGES; $49.95)
REVIEW BY SUSAN LYNN KINGSBURY

… I realized with a pang of joy that in spite of all that has changed in the world … that a boat can still take you to places that have remained virtually untouched.
– Jimmy Cornell

Jimmy Cornell’s World Cruising Destinations is a valuable in-depth reference book written by an extremely knowledgeable and passionate sailor. Intent on providing readers the most pertinent information available, he succeeds in delivering a multitude of data in an organized volume, making it easy for cruisers, and those planning or even dreaming of sailing to the world’s cruising destinations, to plan their cruise, choose a destination, and begin preparing for the adventure.

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SHRADER MARKS: KEELHOUSE

BY ROB SMITH (DRINIAN PRESS, 2012; 440 PAGES; $15.95, $4.99 KINDLE)REVIEW BY KAREN LARSON

With two novels now wrapped inside one big cover, Rob Smith makes a gigantic statement in the fascinating game of “What If?” The scenario in his two Shrader Marks books, Night Voices and Keelhouse, now packaged together as Keelhouse, is riveting. What if a very large meteor struck the Earth, say, in Antarctica? What if that very large impact caused shifting of the fragile tectonic plates in the Pacific Rim? What if those shifts resulted in heavy volcanic activity, earthquakes, and tsunamis? What if the Antarctic ice melted as a result and the seas rose, not a few feet, but hundreds of feet? What would life on Earth be like then?

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THE SHIPKILLER

BY JUSTIN SCOTT (PEGASUS BOOKS, RELEASE DATE JUNE 8, 2012; 432 PAGES; $25.95 U.S. / $30.00 CANADA)
REVIEW BY WAYNE GAGNON

 

In the mid-1970s the world changed forever as we, the general public, were made aware of just how fragile our way of life is during the first oil shortage. Those of us who are old enough can remember when lines formed at gas stations around the country, and although we had never heard of OPEC, it soon became a household name. It was against this backdrop that Justin Scott wrote The Shipkiller, which has just been put back into print in a 35th anniversary edition. This is a modern-day David and Goliath story, with Peter Hardin as David. Goliath is the 1,800-foot Ultra-large Crude Carrier (ULCC) Leviathan that runs down Peter’s 40-foot ketch, Siren, during a squall in the North Atlantic without even noticing. Carolyn, Peter’s wife, is killed but somehow Peter survives and, after reaching several dead ends in his attempts to bring those responsible to justice, he takes matters into his own hands. The story takes us sailing from the North Atlantic to the Persian Gulf, with a few side trips into political intrigue, military corruption, and a little romance, though not enough of the latter to diminish the story.

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CALY’S ISLAND

BY DICK HERMAN (AUTHORHOUSE, 240 PAGES; 2011; $14.99 PAPER; $2.99 KINDLE AND NOOK)
REVIEW BY CHAS. HAGUE

 

The Freakin’ Old Guys (FOGs for short, and that first word isn’t the one they use) are a group of older sailors doing a messabout in the San Juan Islands. There is Gibson Stanford, known as Gib, retired judge; Rufus Gunnermeyer, a blacksmith; Peter L. Lacy, the group’s lawyer and ladies’ man; Zack Hilber, spatially challenged former CIA operative; Hornsby Blair, known as “H” or “The Admiral,” the de facto leader of the group; and Steve Latrans, a man with secrets. A last-minute addition is Sean Homes, a punk teenager in perpetual trouble. The group decides he would benefit from spending time with “real men” in a challenging environment. It sounds hokey, but the scene where the men meet to discuss the young man’s future comes off powerfully—this is what men do (or should).

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THE LATEST NEWS FROM PURGATORY COVE

AS TOLD TO PAUL ESTERLE BY PAUL ESTERLE (LULU, 171 PAGES; 2012; $15.95)
REVIEW BY CAROLYN CORBETT

The Latest News from Purgatory Cove is a collection of 40 two- to three-page-long “letters” from the fictional Purgatory Cove Fish Dock & Marina. Readers familiar with Garrison Keillor might find the format of these fictional accounts reminiscent of “The News from Lake Wobegon.” Each is bracketed with a beginning of “Well, it’s been a slow week here in Purgatory Cove,” and an ending of “Other than that, it’s been a slow week here in Purgatory Cove.” In-between, Sam, Wade, and Lefty sail from one debacle to another. A few visitors manage to find the marina, but the threesome, along with Sam’s momma, soon drive them off. And that’s the way Sam likes it.

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SAFER OFFSHORE; CRISIS MANAGEMENT AND EMERGENCY REPAIRS AT SEA

BY ED MAPES (PARADISE CAY PUBLICATIONS, INC., 2010; 300 PAGES; $19.95)
REVIEW BY WAYNE GAGNON

There’s an old adage among pilots: “Those who have and those who will,” meaning that sooner or later, every pilot will come close to landing an airplane without extending the landing gear. Similarly, when it comes to spending time on boats, be it offshore passagemaking, fishing, or day sailing, eventually we’re all going to have some sort of emergency. Safer Offshore: Crisis Management and Emergency Repairs at Sea, by Ed Mapes, is another in a long list of books that deal with on-the-water emergencies. It’s quite evident early on that Mapes knows what he’s talking about and his 30-plus years of experience are clearly visible. His easy-to-read style makes this a very user-friendly book.

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THE LIMBUS OF THE MOON

BY BILL MEGO (<WWW.BILLMEGO.COM>, 2011; $24.95; 360 PAGES)
REVIEW BY CHAS. HAGUE

 

The Limbus of the Moon is a novel in the mold of a Dan Brown thriller, or at least it tries to be. Viator venenatusis a sea urchin, very rare, incredibly valuable, and possibly the source of life-saving drugs. A mysterious eccentric thinks he can breed them in captivity. He’s persuaded a rich Chinese shipping magnate with ties to Asian criminal organizations to fund an expedition to locate this possibly extinct animal.

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REEDS KNOT HANDBOOK: A POCKET GUIDE TO KNOTS, HITCHES AND BENDS

BY JIM WHIPPY (PARADISE CAY PUBLICATIONS, 2011; $9.95; 128 PAGES)
REVIEW BY WAYNE GAGNON

 

As a kid I was kind of a klutz. In fact, I can still hear my buddy Chuck calling out to me from second after yet another strikeout, “Wayne, I’ve never seen anyone as uncoordinated as you!” Almost 50 years later, I still have to laugh at Chuck’s honesty. When I was a Boy Scout we had to learn some basic knots, and that same lack of hand-eye coordination haunted me there too. I managed to learn a few and I was amazed to find that, after many years, I could still tie a bowline and whip the end of a rope. So when I was asked to review Reeds Knot Handbook I thought it was nothing less than karma.

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OUTFITTING THE OFFSHORE CRUISING SAILBOAT: REFITTING USED SAILBOATS FOR BLUE-WATER VOYAGING

BY PETER I. BERMAN (PARADISE CAY PUBLICATIONS, 2012; $19.95; 256 PAGES)
REVIEW BY KAREN LARSON

The subtitle, Refitting Used Sailboats for Blue-Water Voyaging, of Peter Berman’s new book, Outfitting the Offshore Cruising Sailboat, tells why it’s an important new reference for good old boaters. Peter’s basic premise is that new offshore cruising sailboats are prohibitively expensive and somewhat uncommon, while the market in used cruising sailboats is rich and vast and flourishing. There’s something there for everyone.

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LESSON PLANS AHOY! HANDS-ON LEARNING FOR SAILING CHILDREN AND HOME SCHOOLING SAILORS

BY NADINE SLAVINSKI (SLAVINSKI-SCHWEITZER PRESS, 2ND EDITION, 2011; $26.95; 267 PAGES)
REVIEW BY CAROLYN CORBETT

 

Lesson Plans Ahoy! is an excellent educational guide for cruising families. Author Nadine Slavinski is a teacher, a parent, and a sailor, and has capitalized on her knowledge in each of those roles in this fine book. She has a master’s degree in education, has taught in international schools for 15 years, and took a year-long sailing sabbatical with her husband and 4-year-old son.

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THE SAILOR’S BOOK OF SMALL CRUISING SAILBOATS: REVIEWS AND COMPARISONS OF 360 BOATS UNDER 26 FEET

BY STEVE HENKEL (INTERNATIONAL MARINE/MCGRAW HILL, 2010; 412 PAGES; $29.95)
REVIEW BY PAUL MARAVELAS

Steve Henkel collected information for decades before compiling this fascinating compendium on fiberglass cruising sailboats sold in the U.S. Nearly all of the boats get a full page, with roughly half of each page devoted to plans. The 8½ x-11 inch format is large enough to make the plans accessible, and Henkel shows us a sail plan, a full hull profile from abeam, and an interior plan for each boat. Each review includes Henkel’s own opinion of the boat’s best and worst features, and data for several comparable boats. The book is organized in six sections, according to boat length, so comparison is easy. Henkel uses length on deck to categorize the boats.

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HERE WE ARE: THE HISTORY, MEANING AND MAGIC OF GPS

BY JIM CARRIER (NEW WORD CITY, INC., 2011; 29 PAGES–EBOOK; $2.99)
REVIEW BY JAMES WILLIAMS

In his electronic book, Here We Are, Jim Carrier, author of several books including the well-received The Ship and the Storm about the 1998 loss of Windjammer Cruises’ 282-foot schooner Fantome to Hurricane Mitch, briefly recounts the history of the Navstar Global Positioning System, simply known today as GPS.

Appropriate to the electronic technology he describes, Carrier’s work is available only as an eBook and makes use of numerous links to online information. His links act in some ways as valuable footnotes, which should be the point of links in eBooks and online essays; however, I found that links to commonplace names such as “Columbus,” “sextant,” “Cold War,” and “Soviet Union” distracted my reading.

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CRUISING CONVERSATIONS WITH A DARING DUO

BY CHARLES AND CORINNE KANTER (SAILCO PRESS, 2011; 364 PAGES; $19.95)
REVIEW BY CHAS. HAGUE

 

This book by Charles and Corinne Kanter, the daring duo of the title, is the ninth they have written about their lives (married 54 years!) spent mostly sailing in mostly catamarans, along the East Coast and the Bahamas. The book is a somewhat randomly thrown together collection of anecdotes, responses to questions asked at boat shows, sea stories, advice pieces, and other goodies.

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GONE TO THE SEA: SELECTED STORIES, VOYAGES, AND PROFILES

BY HERB MCCORMICK (PARADISE CAY PUBLICATIONS, 2011; 313 PAGES; $16.95)
REVIEW BY DAN SPURR


Herb McCormick and I wrote our first books together, after hours, banging away at IBM Selectric typewriters on the second floor of the old Cruising World offices in downtown Newport, Rhode Island. He and then-editor George Day were working on Out There, a fine narrative describing the first BOC Challenge singlehanded round-the-world race. Herb wasn’t too many years out of Williams College, where he starred as wide receiver on the school football team. He was not all that fast running in a straight line, but he was quick, and had great hands. Think Fred Biletnikoff from John Madden’s Oakland Raiders teams. If you’re not old enough to remember those great teams of the ’60s and ’70s, Wes Welker will do for now — short routes, quick moves, great hands.

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